He was certainly a believer in the Christian God. Part of his apologetic in Mere Christianity is that morality manifests itself throughout the world no matter what religious beliefs (or lack thereof) govern the society. Further, morality doesn’t actually look that different in these different societies.

I don’t believe truth is eternal — at least not all truth: 1+1=2 is never not true in theory, but can we imagine a time before humans walked the earth in our current form, when it simply wasn’t possible? 1+1=2 is only knowable when there is a subject to know it.

For more practical truth: The man’s hair is black. Is this always, eternally true? Not always: he may dye his hair, or with age he may go grey. Indeed, before his birth and after his death is it still true? So perhaps we must distinguish between particular truths, and general or “eternal” truths.

The Christian God is, by definition, an eternal truth. But how do we know him? Only in particular ways: through Christ, through Scripture. Our knowledge of him and relationship to him is necessarily limited. But not limited in the same way for every person, and therefore two interpretations of the same information may be correct in their own ways and also incorrect.

Humans do seek to be right. We could even say humans seek to be true. And indeed, one of the many flaws of humanity is that often we let other objectives get in the way of seeking truth. But believing that truth we have is eternal and transcendent — which necessarily means that those with contradictory “truths” must be wrong — is a dangerous thing indeed. The Truth may be eternal, but the truth I have access to is not, even if I am religious. Think of the ways a religious person’s understanding of God, salvation, and spirituality changes as they mature, grow, and learn. The “God” I understood two years ago is not the “God” I know today. Now certainly this is not God changing, but me. But I do not think the distinction is relevant: the conversation is only ever taking place between my understanding and someone else’s.

This may be far off the original track, but I’d like to hear your thoughts.

— Anthony D.

The truth is a trap … you cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you. — Søren Kierkegaard, Journals.

The truth is a trap … you cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you. — Søren Kierkegaard, Journals.