Quite importantly, Socrates was put to death for his debates with people. He also employed the “Socratic method” of continually questioning someone to the point of perplexity.

In Plato’s Apology, Socrates states that he was trying to disprove a god that had told him that he was the most intelligent man in Athens. And so he went to many different “intelligent” people, to discover that they were greater. However, he always discovered that they thought they knew far more than they actually did. And so, as others have mentioned already, he would say, “Neither one of us knows, but at least I know I do not know, so I am the more intelligent man.” And for that, he was put to death. That’s what happens when you live in a society that would rather be pissed off at someone’s pursuit of truth rather than engage with it and struggle through it.

The truth is a trap … you cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you. — Søren Kierkegaard, Journals.

The truth is a trap … you cannot get the truth by capturing it, only by its capturing you. — Søren Kierkegaard, Journals.